Selected Works

Sports/Cultural History
Challenging the myths of America’s national pastime
Examining one city’s century-long tortured relationship with its baseball team and, ultimately, itself.
Careers -- Law and the Workplace
A guide to achieving the personal and professional fulfillment the practice of law can offer, but does not guarantee.

Welcome

Mitch Nathanson is a professor of legal writing at the Villanova University School of Law whose scholarship focuses on the intersection of sports, law and society. He has written numerous articles examining the interplay between, most notably, baseball and American culture. His article, "The Irrelevance of Baseball's Antitrust Exemption: A Historical Review," won the 2006 McFarland-SABR Award which is presented in recognition of the best historical or biographical baseball articles of the year. His 2008 book, The Fall of the 1977 Phillies: How a Baseball Team’s Collapse Sank a City’s Spirit, is a social history of 20th century Philadelphia as told through the relationship between the city and its baseball teams – the Athletics and the Phillies. In 2009 he was the co-producer and writer of "Base Ball: The Philadelphia Game," a documentary "webisode" on the 19th century development of the game within the city that is part of a larger documentary project, "Philadelphia: The Great Experiment," currently in production and to which he is a contributing scholar. In addition, he was a scholarly advisor to the 2011 HBO production, "The Curious Case of Curt Flood." In the United States, he has lectured at, among other venues, the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and since 2011 has been a Guest Professor in the International Sports Law Program at the Instituto Superior de Derecho y Economia in Madrid, Spain. In addition to his most recent book, A People’s History of Baseball, he is authoring a chapter on law and politics for the upcoming textbook: Understanding Baseball: Approaches to the Scholarly Study of America’s Game (McFarland & Co., Inc., Publishers). His latest article "Who Exempted Baseball, Anyway: The Curious Development of the Antitrust Exemption that Never Was," was published in the Winter, 2013 edition of the Harvard Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law and won the 2013 McFarland-SABR Award. He is currently at work on a biography of controversial slugger Dick Allen, to be published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 2015.

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